Understanding Energy Data: More Points for Metering Not Always Better

fries napkins ketchup

It’s a truism that you can never get enough of a good thing. Think of the extra stuff you grabbed during your last fast food run: Fistful of napkins? Thirteen packets of ketchup?–Check, check.

Not so surprisingly, many industrial facility managers look at taking a similar approach with metering energy use: The more points, the better. Despite—or maybe because of—the richness of available data, extracting and then maximizing its value can be difficult. Some customers have had many points installed with “wires still dangling,” meaning collected data never feeds into a system. Just as frequently, these points are tied into a system but views, dashboards, and reports don’t communicate beneficial information.

Why? Call it a case of data overload. The complexity of working with and understanding energy data—especially high-volume interval data—increases with the number of points. Yes, you can always aggregate metered data for reporting, but it is often not worth the expense to add several sub-meters, for example, when a single meter upstream can capture the same data and a predictive energy model can be used to make the most of that data.

So how many points are optimal for monitoring? Or what should even be metered? There may not be any hard and fast rules, but a minimalist approach could have value and save you some headaches.

Here are three helpful tips to consider as you build (or reconfigure) your next energy information system (EIS):

1) Meter Only What You Plan to Monitor

It makes little sense to have streams of data you don’t ever look at, or can’t make sense of when you do. Some questions you should be able to answer:

  • What data streams do you set some realistic alarms on?
  • Who will respond to those alarms?
  • What will they do when alarms occur?
  • Is the data granular enough to determine the problem, or do you have to talk to system operators to figure out what changed?

2) Meter Only What You Can Effectively Improve

Forget metering the “Steady Eddies,” the systems that always have the same run times or output. Because people drive energy usage, pay special attention to systems that can backslide from previous efficiency gains (like savings acquired from improvements to operations and maintenance [O&M]) or those with fluctuating usage schedules. Some questions you should be able to answer:

  • If energy use of a given sub-system is up, can you assess why?
  • Are you able to allocate sub-system energy to the production lines or processes driving that use?
  • Could we get by with less monitoring and an effective whole-facility or key sub-system model factoring in key energy drivers to effectively show when we are getting better or worse?

3) Meter Only What Works within Your Budget

It comes as little surprise that adding several sub-meters to an EIS can add considerable cost to the project —not only hardware, but a lot of personnel time as well. What you might not realize is that it can also intensify the pressure to drive more savings to justify the higher costs. If you’re working too hard to justify the expense to management, you may want to reconsider the scale of your monitoring system. An incremental approach can prove the effectiveness of monitoring one step at a time, and may be the only way to get funding for your monitoring project in the first place.

If you’d like to discuss the right scope for your monitoring project, give us a call. We’ll work with you to find a solution that fits within your budget while maximizing your return on the effort.

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Energy Tracking Software For Continuous Energy Improvement

Orchestrating a strategic energy management (SEM) or a continuous energy improvement (CEI) program is an ambitious endeavor. CEOs, managers, and facility operators all have to understand the impact of factors such as production and weather on their facility’s energy consumption. Systems need to be developed to identify and manage energy saving opportunities. And then, a facility-wide energy team should be established to implement projects and quantify the results.

Given the constant changes in product lines, shipping schedules, weather patterns, and personnel, industrial energy management demands a tool that offers maximum flexibility for viewing data while helping to drive operations and maintenance projects to completion.  

Continuous Energy Improvement

Earlier this year, Cascade launched the SENSEI™ energy efficiency platform. Based on Cascade’s nearly 20 years in the industrial energy management business, SENSEI was designed by energy engineers to not only monitor energy usage but to also drive and track continuous energy savings at the largest and most complex industrial sites.

SENSEI is a multifaceted platform that can help support any CEI program. With “Explore” users can visualize energy performance quickly and easily without getting bogged down by multiple, customized spreadsheets. “Act” organizes technical and operational opportunities for systematic implementation giving team members a central location from which to coordinate tasks and ensure timely completion.

One of SENSEI’s most powerful aspects is the ability to tag changes in normalized energy performance to specific activities. This allows energy teams to easily visualize energy performance, manage their activities accordingly, and quantify savings so that management can quickly see the value of their investment.

For utility account managers, SENSEI matches program offerings to customer needs at exactly the right time—leading to greater customer satisfaction and integration across program portfolios.

SENSEI can be the energy tracking software that makes the difference to your CEI program by reducing the administrative, analytical, and organizational hurdles involved. SENSEI makes CEI work for utilities and corporate customers alike.

For more information, or to schedule a demonstration call 866-321-4573.

Thinking about continuous energy improvement? Simplify program complexity with SENSEI.

 

 

Orchestrating a strategic energy management (SEM) or a continuous energy improvement (CEI) program is an ambitious endeavor. CEOs, managers, and facility operators all have to understand the impact of factors such as production and weather on their facility’s energy consumption. Systems need to be developed to identify and manage energy saving opportunities. And then, a facility-wide energy team should be established to implement projects and quantify the results.

 

Given the constant changes in product lines, shipping schedules, weather patterns, and personnel, industrial energy management demands a tool that offers maximum flexibility for viewing data while helping to drive operations and maintenance projects to completion.

 

A common platform can help bring these disparate elements together.

Earlier this year, Cascade launched the SENSEI™ energy efficiency platform. Based on Cascade’s nearly 20 years in the industrial energy management business, SENSEI was designed by energy engineers to not only monitor energy usage but to also drive and track continuous energy savings at the largest and most complex industrial sites.

 

SENSEI is a multifaceted platform that can help support any CEI program. With “Explore” users can visualize energy performance quickly and easily without getting bogged down by multiple, customized spreadsheets. “Act” organizes technical and operational opportunities for systematic implementation giving team members a central location from which to coordinate tasks and ensure timely completion.

 

One of SENSEI’s most powerful aspects is the ability to tag changes in normalized energy performance to specific activities. This allows energy teams to easily visualize energy performance, manage their activities accordingly, and quantify savings so that management can quickly see the value of their investment.

 

For utility account managers, SENSEI matches program offerings to customer needs at exactly the right time—leading to greater customer satisfaction and integration across program portfolios.

 

SENSEI can be the tool that makes the difference to your CEI program by reducing the administrative, analytical, and organizational hurdles involved. SENSEI makes CEI work for utilities and corporate customers alike.

 

For more information, or to schedule a demonstration call 866-321-4573.

Energy Enlightenment in 3 Steps

  1. Establish Performance

    Creating a baseline for true performance helps you learn where you consume energy and what factors drive consumption. SENSEI service offerings help you build an energy profile and information system, so you get accurate, up-to-the-minute energy info controlled for seasonality, production levels, facility activities, and more.

  2. Drive Action

    Encouraging staff to stay engaged in energy efficiency ensures you can maximize return on equipment investments and continuously add savings to the bottom line. SENSEI connects actions to energy performance to help your staff know which measures work and which don’t—so you can focus time and money on the right projects.

  3. Track Savings

    Gauging the real-time effectiveness of your energy efficiency efforts provides not only flexibility but also a way to financially justify additional measures and quantify your progress toward cost-reduction goals. With SENSEI, you can manage your energy efficiency program and see the impact of specific measures with point-in-time accuracy.